National Foundations Join Forces to Combat Housing Instability

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / National Foundations Join Forces to Combat Housing Instability Affordable Housing Affordable Housing Crisis Annie E. Casey Foundation Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Ford Foundation Funders for Housing and Opportunity Grants housing assistance John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation JPB Foundation Kresge Foundation Melville Charitable Trust Oak Foundation Single Family Rental 2018-02-20 David Wharton Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribe About Author: David Wharton The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago According to the National Low Income Housing Coalition, there is currently no state in the U.S. where a person earning the minimum wage and working 40 hours per week can afford to rent a basic two-bedroom apartment, much less purchase or rent a home. The lack of affordable housing is being felt across the country, even as home prices trend higher and inventory continues to be scarce overall. Now nine of the largest private foundations in the country are joining forces to combat this problem.The newly announced Funders for Housing and Opportunity will unite organizations including the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the JPB Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, the Melville Charitable Trust, and the Oak Foundation. As Funders for Housing and Opportunity, they will work collaboratively to ensure that “individuals and families across America who spend more than half of their income on rent—or have no homes at all—will be able to afford safe, stable rentals in thriving communities.”Jeanne Fekade-Sellassie, Project Director, Funders for Housing and Opportunity, said, “Any one foundation, working alone, can have only limited impact given the scale of the problem. Too many lower- and middle-income families struggle to afford each month’s rent. We need a monumental shift in how rental housing security and its impacts are addressed at the national level. By working together, Funders for Housing and Opportunity and our partners can be a powerful force for change.”Prior to this collaboration, the various foundations making up the Funders for Housing and Opportunity invested more than $65 million in domestic housing-related causes in 2017. To get the ball rolling, Funders for Housing and Opportunity has awarded four grants, totalling $4.9 million, to several different nonprofit organizations, including the Center for Community Change’s Housing Trust Fund Project, the National Housing Trust and Enterprise Community Partners, the National Low Income Housing Coalition, and the Partnership for Children and Youth.“Housing is much more than a roof over our heads—it is a basic human need and it bolsters entire communities,” said Susan Thomas of the Melville Charitable Trust, Chair of the collaborative. “When homes are decent, stable and affordable, kids do better in school, seniors are healthier longer and more socially connected, workers are more productive, and families have more disposable income to boost our local economies. For this reason, we’re bridging across fields to make housing opportunity a shared priority.”Without positive action, the affordable housing crisis will likely only get worse. Moreover, a December market analysis by Zillow reported that the booming single-family rental market was making the affordable housing crisis worse in some markets by further limiting options for lower- and middle-income buyers.Thankfully, the issue has been receiving a lot of attention in recent months. In December, Fannie Mae announced its Sustainable Communities Innovation Challenge, offering up $10 million for solutions to the country’s affordable housing issues. This new Funders for Housing and Opportunity collaborative stands to shine even more light on a serious and complex problem. Sign up for DS News Daily center_img Tagged with: Affordable Housing Affordable Housing Crisis Annie E. Casey Foundation Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Ford Foundation Funders for Housing and Opportunity Grants housing assistance John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation JPB Foundation Kresge Foundation Melville Charitable Trust Oak Foundation Single Family Rental Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago February 20, 2018 2,969 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles National Foundations Join Forces to Combat Housing Instability The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, Journal, News Share Save Previous: How Many Interest Rate Hikes Inbound in 2018? Next: First Mortgage Default Rates Hold Steadylast_img read more

Women’s hockey embracing underdog role

first_imgWhen looking to give an example of a sports dynasty, University of Wisconsin fans have to look no further than the Wisconsin women’s hockey team. In their 13 seasons, the Badgers have four national championships, six championship game appearances and seven NCAA Tournament appearances.The team capped off last season with a loss in the National Championship game. As a result, the team was ranked second in the polls early this season. Needless to say, expectations for the team coming into the season were high. However, Wisconsin has had a few hiccups along the way.Currently,the Badgers are ranked eighth in the nation coming off two devastating losses to undefeated Minnesota and hold a 15-9-2 record. At the moment, they are looking down the barrel at a 10-loss season for the first time since 2009.Instead of getting down on themselves, the players have decided to keep working hard, polish up a few things and gain momentum before the postseason begins in a few weeks.“We need to win every game from here on out,” junior captain Alex Rigsby said. “We have had some games we haven’t won where we should have won, but that’s part of the sport and you have to grow from it.”That notion of learning from mistakes and moving on permeates the Badgers’ ideology. Despite not having a phenomenal record, as they have the past few years, the Badgers still keep confidence.“We have come together as a team,” Rigsby said. “We continue to improve as we go along.”Losses have somewhat lost their sting in this year of disappointing performances. The Badgers have brushed the losses aside and continue to push forward and improve in an attempt to make a postseason run.“We keep working hard and I think that’s what’s most important,” senior captain Brianna Decker said.As tends to happen throughout a season, the major issues have been ironed out. The Wisconsin women’s hockey team is no different. The problems of the early season have been balanced, and now the team is focusing on polishing up their game in order to be at their best going into the postseason.While Rigsby pushes for a combined-effort approach with all players playing their best, coach Mark Johnson looks to reduce the number of small errors made by the team going into the playoffs.“At this point it is about competing and trying to eliminate mistakes and missed opportunities,” Johnson said. “You do those things and you have better chances to win.”After being swept at home, the Badgers look to bounce back this weekend at St. Cloud State, whom they handled easily in late November, skating to 6-3 and 6-0 wins. They then take on No. 10 Minnesota-Duluth in their last home series of the season. The team finishes off the 2012-2013 regular season campaign at Bemidji State, a team that dealt the Badgers a loss early in the season.The players and coaching staff emphasized the importance of coming out of these games strong.“It’s extremely important,” Johnson said. “It’s the timing factor; you want to be playing your best hockey those last three weeks.”Despite a tough schedule these last three weeks, Johnson has confidence in his team’s ability to go into the postseason with a six-game win streak.“All indications say we are in position,” Johnson said. “We have physical strength. The attitudes are there and that confidence is showing up on the ice.”Some Badger players found the silver lining of their early season struggles. The usually dominant Wisconsin women’s hockey program has fallen back into the pack a bit, taking the target off their back and transferring it to undefeated boarder rival Minnesota.“It would be nice to play [Minnesota] tough and come out with a nice win,” Decker expressed.One thing is for certain: the Wisconsin Badgers will not be playing in their usual one-seed position this year. Despite the team not being used to the underdog position, they still have confidence. And if the past tells us anything, a confident underdog is a scary underdog.last_img read more