Cifras y Datos de la Iglesia Episcopal

first_img Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [31 de Octubre de 2013] Basado en la información recibida de los informes parroquiales, nuevas cifras y datos sobre el número de miembros de la Iglesia Episcopal han sido publicados aquí.Entre los datos:– En el 2012, la membresía de la Iglesia Episcopal fue 2.066.710 con 1.894.181 en las diócesis nacionales (50 estados en los Estados Unidos) y 172.529 en las diócesis internacionales (fuera de los EE.UU.).– Treinta y tres diócesis nacionales mostraron un crecimiento en la membresía  en el último año: Alaska, Arkansas, Atlanta, California, Florida Central, Chicago, Colorado, el este de Tennessee, El Camino Real, La Florida, Fond du Lac, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas; Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Navajoland, Carolina del Norte, Dakota del Norte, Norte de California, Oklahoma, Pittsburgh, San Joaquin, Tennessee, Texas; Alta Carolina del Sur, Washington, West Tennessee, el oeste de Massachusetts, Western New York.– En las diócesis internacionales, el crecimiento del número de miembros se ha caracterizado en tres diócesis: Ecuador-Litoral, Puerto Rico y VenezuelaInformación adicional se encuentra en la página de Investigación de la Iglesia Episcopal aquí. Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cifras y Datos de la Iglesia Episcopal The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Posted Oct 31, 2013 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

Federal government studies Occupy Sandy movement

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Volunteers unload donated material at the Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn, New York shortly after Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew[Episcopal News Service] The Occupy Sandy network that sprung up in the days after Hurricane Sandy devastated vast stretches of New York and New Jersey has caught the attention of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which says it is looking to broaden future disaster relief efforts.However, not everyone is taking that explanation at face value even though they say the report does a good job at outlining how well Occupy Sandy has worked.Occupy Sandy tapped into the organization and volunteer power of Occupy Wall Street which had led a multicity protest movement centered on economic inequality just more than a year before Sandy hit. The report, titled The Resilient Social Network, calls Occupy Wall Street a “planned social movement” while it characterizes Occupy Sandy as “neither planned nor expected.”The Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, New York, in the Diocese of Long Island, quickly became the second major Occupy Sandy supply-distribution and volunteer-training hub. The activity at St. Luke and St. Matthew complemented the work begun a few days earlier at St. Jacobi Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn.“In the days, weeks, and months that followed, ‘Occupy Sandy’ became one of the leading humanitarian groups providing relief to survivors across New York City and New Jersey,” the report notes. “At its peak, it had grown to an estimated 60,000 volunteers – more than four times the number deployed by the American Red Cross.”“Unlike traditional disaster response organizations, there were no appointed leaders, no bureaucracy, no regulations to follow, no pre-defined mission, charter, or strategic plan.  There was just relief.”That relief effort out of St. Luke and St. Matthew continued even after an arson fire two days before Christmas 2012 caused major damage.“In the Diocese of Long Island, where this movement took physical root in several of our churches, we were fortunate to have a bishop who encouraged Occupy Sandy in every way possible,” the Rev. Michael Sniffen, rector of St. Luke and St. Matthew, told Episcopal News Service. “In places where our bishops and clergy gave in to fear and risk aversion in the aftermath of the storm, the work of well-intentioned, skilled neighbors was often thwarted by lack of staging and organizing space. Many of our churchyards, hallways and unused parish halls sat empty during a time when they were desperately needed.”Long Island Bishop Lawrence Provenzano said the diocese is “very proud of its involvement with Occupy Sandy and the results.”“This is what incarnate love looks like!,” says Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn, New York on its Facebook page. The nave began being used as a distribution hub for supplies shortly after Hurricane Sandy stuck. Photo: Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew“From a religious standpoint, this was the church at its best, an example of the Gospel in action,” he said in an e-mail to ENS. “This report is really an acknowledgment of how a cooperative effort – between the church, government entities, the private sector, and the wider community – can improve disaster response in the future. It is also an acknowledgement that cooperative decision-making, planning, and execution can be a model for success; this model, in my mind, is as ancient as the church itself.”In addition, Sniffen said, the church communities “that truly opened themselves to aid neighbors by any means necessary also opened themselves to spiritual awakening.”Research for the report was conducted between June and August 2013. The report is dated Sept. 30, 2013 and was recently released by the Homeland Security Studies and Analysis Institute.In its introduction, the report notes that Occupy Sandy was a “difficult research subject for many of the same reasons it succeeded in helping so many communities in New York and New Jersey: its membership and infrastructure are fluid, it has no elected leaders, and it conducted autonomous relief activities across a large geographic area.” Occupy Sandy is called a “humanitarian offshoot of Occupy Wall Street” in the report, whose authors also describe it as “a social movement, not so much a tangible group.”The report at one point categorizes Occupy Sandy as an “emergent response group 2.0” of the kind that often spring up spontaneously after disaster strikes. These groups are different from “traditional response organizations,” the report notes, such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency or the Red Cross. The “2.0” refers to the fact that groups such as Occupy Sandy used social media to publicize, organize and coordinate its work.A small group of Occupy Wall Street began discussing the anticipated storm a week before it hit the East Coast over social media, the report says. When the storm hit on the night of Oct. 29, 2012, member of that group began share damage reports and discuss how to help and whether there was interest in beginning a relief effort.“Seemingly out of nowhere emerged a volunteer army of young, educated, tech-savvy individuals with time and a desire to help others,” the report says.However, the report also notes that Occupy Sandy’s “horizontal organizing structure” was not without its problems. While “there was no need to seek permission to do something” and thus people in need were served quickly, the report says “without leaders, there was less oversight” and less accountability. The accountability issue raised difficulties for some traditional response organizations in terms of their own accountability, according to the report.Purpose of the report questionedThe authors said their “primary purpose in conducting a case study on Occupy Sandy is to provide the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) with a basic understanding of an emerging type of grassroots relief collective so that it might enable government to work in a unity of effort with such groups when the next disaster strikes.”However, the report also describes reluctance on the part of some Occupy Sandy participants to talk to a group connected with the Department of Homeland Security about their work. Most of the people and organizations the researchers contacted “were willing to speak quite candidly, but many respectfully declined our request,” according to the report. The report does not suggest the reason for that reluctance however, the Department of Homeland Security has acknowledged, by way of more than 200 pages of heavily redacted documents, that it joined other law enforcement agencies to monitor Occupy Wall Street.Sniffen echoed some of that concern, saying that “the DHS’s interest in the Occupy movement and Occupy Sandy in particular raises red flags regarding the freedom of communities to organize for good without being treated as suspicious.”“That being said, the findings of this report are encouraging,” he added. “The report is clear in its analysis that Occupy Sandy was effective where larger, more bureaucratic organizations were not. The movement’s significant role in helping communities recover is now undeniable. The analysis of the ability of horizontal ad hoc groups to be effective change agents in the world should be read, marked, learned and inwardly digested by The Episcopal Church as we continue our own conversation about internal restructuring.”The Rev. John Merz, the vicar of Church of the Ascension in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, who helped organize churches to open their facilities to respond to Sandy, also expressed concern about the DHS institute’s attention to Occupy Sandy. He noted that the organization’s website says it was created as a “dedicated, not-for-profit institute to provide the federal government with analytic capabilities to support effective counterterrorism-related decision-making and program execution.”The department has always regarded Occupy Wall Street “as a form of active domestic terrorism albeit in the early stages of gestation” and thus it took notice when some participants “reformed around relief work with such astounding capacity,” Merz said.Even though the study is what Merz called “appreciative,” it “is by nature defensive, given the mission of the institute and the larger mission of DHS” and is centered on the issue of “power and how it is exercised.”“I did not see anywhere in the report analysis of how many soup cans churches or civic groups managed to donate or how many people made peanut butter and jelly sandwiches … its concern with power in this case is that it was employed so effectively by a group that it has had under surveillance and was working for structural change and justice,” he wrote in an e-mail to ENS.While the report might be used to help non-governmental organizations and governmental aid agencies adopt new practices, Merz said, it is more likely that it will be used to “keep a thumb on social grassroots movements and networks.” He predicted that the department and the U.S. military “may use the report to incorporate some of the OWS and OS network practices into their own ‘counter terror’ practices if they would serve in curtailing the power of people to organize on a grassroots level.”That opinion, Merz acknowledged, “may put me in the minority in the Episcopal Church who seem to think Empire is only something to be ruminated on and preached about in relation to Jesus and the Romans.”Merz and Sniffen were both involved in Occupy Wall Street and were arrested Dec. 17, 2011 after they and retired Episcopal Bishop George Packard entered a fenced property – owned by Trinity Episcopal Church, Wall Street – in Duarte Square in Lower Manhattan as part of Occupy Wall Street’s “D17 Take Back the Commons” event to mark three months since the movement’s launch.The report says other traditional response organizations were initially guarded about coordinating their work with Occupy Sandy. For example, the report describes an invitation-only telephone conference call in early November 2012 “amid the fog of the response to Superstorm Sandy” during which participants heard someone identify themselves as “this is Occupy.”“Conversation stopped,” the report says and representatives of other relief agencies later told researchers that they wondered why Occupy Wall Street was present.The Occupy Sandy person, whose name is not disclosed, was asked to explain his or her presence and the person replied that Occupy Sandy was “part of Occupy Wall Street but not directly associated with it,” according to the report.“‘At that point, we all became very guarded in what we said,’ the official told us,” the report continues. “Personally, and here she said she could not speak for the group, she perceived that the uninvited caller was a protestor and remembers thinking ‘we know what we are doing here, they just do not get it.’”The report’s authors conclude that Occupy Sandy not only eventually convinced the unnamed official that its participants “get it”; it also convinced local communities, the mainstream media and those 60,000 people who signed on as volunteers.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Mar 18, 2014 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Federal government studies Occupy Sandy movement Some participants worry about how the study will be used Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

North Dakota diocese to welcome pilgrimages at Standing Rock interpretive…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Racial Justice & Reconciliation, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By David PaulsenPosted Oct 14, 2019 Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Standing Rock Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Indigenous Ministries, Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Youth camp participants pose for a group photo in July in front of the new Star Lodge at St. Gabriel’s Camp in Solen, North Dakota. Photo: John Floberg[Episcopal News Service] A new lodge at an Episcopal youth camp on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation will double as a Native American interpretive center, highlighting local history and culture for visitors drawn to the region by an interest in the indigenous rights advocacy there.The Episcopal Church was a prominent supporter of tribal demonstrators who in 2016 tried to block construction of part of an oil pipeline that they feared could threaten Standing Rock’s drinking water. Despite their objections, the Dakota Access Pipeline was allowed to cross the Missouri River just north of the reservation, and oil began pumping in June 2017.Since then, the Diocese of North Dakota has welcomed various outside groups, interested in learning about the fight for indigenous and ecological justice, at its St. Gabriel’s Camp in Solen, North Dakota, a few miles west of the Missouri River on the northern edge of the reservation. Disciples of Christ youth groups have visited in each of the past two years. A group from Dayton University in Ohio visited in May, and another is coming in November from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota.The Rev. John Floberg, rector at the diocese’s three congregations serving Standing Rock, has worked with other church leaders to accommodate such pilgrimages as best they can, including by setting up visits with tribal officials and residents. That spirit of welcome is about to swell with the development of the 2,700-square-foot Star Lodge at the camp to serve as an interpretive center.“We’re looking at trying to help people translate what is here to their own communities,” Floberg told Episcopal News Service.The lodge at St. Gabriel’s Camp is named after the Rev. Terry Star, a 40-year-old deacon and member of Executive Council who died suddenly in 2014 while studying to become a priest. The Rev. Angela Goodhouse-Mauai, who was ordained as a deacon with Star in 2007, said in an interview with ENS that she thought of him as a brother.“That was a big loss for us,” Goodhouse-Mauai said.Star’s great-grandfather was Chief Red Hail, whose name had graced the camp’s previous lodge, until it was struck by lightning and burned down in August 2018. Now, with the help of a United Thank Offering grant and additional funds scheduled to be approved this week by Executive Council, the new Star Lodge will not only restore what was lost in last year’s fire. It also will incorporate geothermal heating and solar power, while expanding the diocese’s capacity to host youth groups in the summer and other church groups year-round.The overall project costs about $280,000, Floberg said, and the structural shell of the new lodge already has been built with money received through the diocese’s insurance after last year’s fire. The $58,000 grant from United Thank Offering, or UTO, and about $20,000 from Executive Council will be used to complete the inside of the lodge and install the renewable energy sources.Without the sustainable energy upgrade, the diocese wouldn’t be able to afford to keep the lodge open in the cold winter months, said Floberg, who also serves as president of the Diocese of North Dakota Standing Committee. The diocese already upgraded one of its Standing Rock churches, St. James’ Episcopal Church in Cannon Ball, to geothermal and was able to reduce its winter heating bills to about $130 a month, a small fraction of what propane heat had cost.The size of Star Lodge is another big upgrade. Its meeting hall alone will be as large as the former lodge, and the diocese is in the process of converting the building’s additional space into a self-contained apartment with three bedrooms, bathrooms and a kitchen. The bedrooms will be able to house up to 16 guests, and the meeting hall can be converted to sleeping quarters to accommodate larger groups.In addition to its primary use hosting youth groups, the former Red Hail Lodge was the site of trainings for local residents interested in becoming deacons and priests. Developing Native American leaders for service in the church will continue to be part of the mission at Star Lodge, Floberg said.Star Lodge’s mission mirrors the dedication that its namesake deacon showed to the work of guiding young people in their spiritual development to become church leaders, Goodhouse-Mauai said. At the same time, she is heartened to have the expanded lodge as a resource for visitors “to learn the history of Standing Rock and learn from the people of Standing Rock.”To that end, the diocese aims to develop racial reconciliation pilgrimages, with programs for 10 to 30 people at a time, through Star Lodge’s interpretive center. One of its core themes, according to the UTO grant application, will be the treaties signed more than a century ago between American Indian tribes and the U.S. government, emphasizing the promises made to the country’s native peoples.The broader movement to draw attention to those promises gained steam on Oct. 14 as the federal holiday known as Columbus Day was celebrated by a growing number of Americans as Indigenous Peoples Day.Floberg, speaking to ENS last week, sought to put Christopher Columbus’ 1492 landing in perspective.“Every acre of this land on this continent was already spoken for,” Floberg said. “There was no vast wilderness where there weren’t people already inhabiting territory. … We’re all on Indian land.” That makes it all the more important, he added, for the church to take the lead in learning about and listening to America’s indigenous residents.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Submit a Press Release Tags North Dakota diocese to welcome pilgrimages at Standing Rock interpretive center and lodge Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

Tack Barn / Faulkner Architects

first_img Area:  1418 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs:  Joe Fletcher, Hammond and Company, Concept Lighting Lab, Faulkner Architects Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project ArchDaily Architects: Faulkner Architects Area Area of this architecture project Tack Barn / Faulkner Architects Save this picture!© Joe Fletcher+ 23Curated by Paula Pintos Share CLL. Concept Lighting Lab ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/948827/tack-barn-faulkner-architects Clipboard 2017 Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/948827/tack-barn-faulkner-architects Clipboard United States Tack Barn / Faulkner ArchitectsSave this projectSaveTack Barn / Faulkner Architects Geotechnical Engineer: Structural Engineer: Michael Boucher Landscape Architecture CopyHouses, Adaptive Reuse•Sonoma, United States CopyAbout this officeFaulkner ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentAdaptive reuseSonomaOn FacebookUnited StatesPublished on October 02, 2020Cite: “Tack Barn / Faulkner Architects” 02 Oct 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – LogisVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StonePartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteCupa PizarrasVentilated Facade – CUPACLAD UprightGlassLAMILUXGlass Roof PR60ConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMSkylightsVELUX CommercialAtrium Longlight Skylights in ExperimentariumMetal PanelsLorin IndustriesAnodized Aluminum – Copper FinishesStonesFranken-SchotterWall Covering & CladdingWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusSwingsStudio StirlingHanging Chair – BasketWallcovering / CladdingArrigoni WoodsWood Cladding – AcousticMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Manufacturers: 12th Avenue Iron, Rohl, Duravit, Dynamic Steel Arte, Shaws of Darwen, Smeg Hammond and Company NV5 “COPY” CFBR Structural Group Lighting: Lea & Braze Engineering Projects Civil Engineer: “COPY” Contractor: Houses Landscape: Photographs Architecture:Faulkner ArchitectsMechanical / Electrical Engineer:Sugarpine EngineeringCity:SonomaCountry:United StatesMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Hammond and CompanyRecommended ProductsMetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingWindowsLibartVertical Retracting Doors & WindowsMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Sliding Door – Rabel 62 Slim Super ThermalText description provided by the architects. In the early 1900s, writer Jack London made his permanent home in Glen Ellen, California, a less populated part of the California wine country 50 miles north of San Francisco. Drawn by the land, London believed in the redemptive qualities of rural life. As the first step in creating a similar kind of retreat in Glen Ellen for themselves, a San Francisco family and repeat client asked us to reclaim a 1950s tack barn as living space. The family wanted to stay in the barn on weekends in order to get the lay off the land for future planning and construction. Save this picture!© Joe FletcherThe original tack barn consisted of a single interior tool- and workspace with a crushed gravel floor, upper-level sleeping attic, and a lean-to shed roof for horses. The program called for a minimal living space provided for cooking, sleeping for four, and toilet/shower. Local rules limited the maximum allowable size for an accessory structure to 840 square feet, which constrained the amount of conditioned space possible. We removed the attic and added a recessed exterior covered access and unconditioned sleeping porch, resulting in a useable area of 1,565 square feet with a conditioned area of 839 square feet.  Save this picture!© Hammond and CompanyWe kept the original wood-frame structure and left it unfinished, retaining the visible history and smell of the old Douglas Fir. An insulated locally reclaimed 2×8 redwood rain screen was fitted to the exterior. The spaced boards continue at the entry and sleeping porch spaces. Additional wood framing consists of reclaimed Douglas Fir salvaged from the original construction.Save this picture!© Joe FletcherThe living space is heated with a new radiant concrete slab and is not mechanically cooled. A 10,000 BTU propane-fired boiler provides heat (seldom needed) and domestic hot water. The screened porch is unheated and serves to ventilate the living space with prevailing southwest winds through a shutter-fitted double-hung steel window that provides the cook’s sink with a traditional aspect facing the valley.  Save this picture!© Hammond and CompanySave this picture!Floor plan – ActualSave this picture!© Concept Lighting LabThe reuse of an old barn to house people on weekend getaways from urban life presents a potential conflict in identity for the built form. However, uses change over time. The intention here was to maintain this barn’s familiar appearance in the neighborhood while allowing the signs of human inhabitation to be subtle but evident. Save this picture!© Hammond and CompanyProject gallerySee allShow lessHouse Katz / Gregory Katz ArchitectureSelected ProjectsOpen Call: Architecture Through Re-purposeStudent Competitions Sharelast_img read more

Athletes break their silence

first_imgAndrew HawkinsThe current national uprising against police violence dominates the U.S. political terrain. The revolt began with the Ferguson, Mo., rebellion, ignited by the broad daylight police murder of African-American 18-year-old Michael Brown by a white cop on Aug. 9. Black youth who racist white police officers humiliated, terrorized and demonized day in and day out proclaimed defiantly in the streets that enough is enough — despite the cops’ tanks, rubber bullets and tear gas.This resistance Ferguson youth started has spread like an inferno throughout every part of the U.S. in the last four months. It gained greater momentum on a national scale when a grand jury denied justice to 43-year-old African-American Eric Garner by refusing to indict the white cop who killed him, even though millions heard Garner plead, “I can’t breathe” on video. This ruling came just nine days after a grand jury had refused to indict Darren Wilson for murdering Brown.The cop murders of Brown and Garner and the response to them have helped bring necessary national attention to other police murders, especially of Black and Brown youth like Tamir Rice, John Crawford III and Akai Gurley — to name a few.The growing mass struggle has also impelled famous athletes to stand up against police brutality in greater numbers than since the height of the Black Liberation struggle in the 1960s. Many athletes are wearing “I can’t breathe” T-shirts. This includes entire National Basketball Association teams and star players such as the Los Angeles Lakers, notably Kobe Bryant; the Cleveland Cavaliers, notably LeBron James; the Chicago Bulls, notably Derrick Rose; the Sacramento Kings and the Phoenix Suns. Entire college basketball teams like the Georgetown Hoyas and the Notre Dame women’s squad have done the same.Notre Dame women’s basketball team.The professional athletes getting the most attention play the most popular sport in the U.S. under the National Football League. This was brought home when five members of the St. Louis Rams came out on the field Nov. 30 with their hands up — emulating Michael Brown’s “Hands up, don’t shoot” — and when the Cleveland Browns’ Andrew Hawkins wore a “Justice for Tamir Rice and John Crawford” shirt during the Dec. 14 pre-game warm-up. These actions enraged police departments in their respective cities. All the players are Black.The St. Louis and Cleveland police departments demanded apologies from the players and the teams’ management. No apologies happened. That indicates the powerful impact this uprising has had on athletes of color. It even affects the rich bosses of these teams, who fear any backlash from their own players and fans.In a moving Dec. 15 interview, Hawkins explained, with tears in his eyes, that when he witnessed the video tape of 12-year-old Rice being killed in a park by Cleveland police, he thought about the safety of his 2-year-old son and also the pain the Rice family is going through. He also stated that although he was worried about the reaction he might receive by wearing the shirt, he felt he had no other choice. (cleveland.com, Dec. 15)Seventy percent of the NFL players are African American and other players of color. Even though racist police want them silent, more and more are speaking out over injustice. Despite being well-paid, they still feel the sting of racism. And on the other side of the barricades, the police are feeling the well-deserved sting of deepening animosity and isolation from mainstream U.S.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

DAILY OIL PRICE: June 1

first_img Facebook Pinterest Crude Oil: 65.81 (-1.23)Nymex MTD AVG: 65.8100.Natural Gas: 2.962 (+.010).Gasoline: 2.1434 (-0.0171).Spreads: July/Aug. (+.04) Aug./Sept. (+.24).Plains WTI Posting: 62.25 (-1.25). Octopus Energy U.S. to Discount Customers’ Bills by as Much as 90% Rattler Midstream: 4Q Earnings Snapshot Twitter Facebook Home Local News Business DAILY OIL PRICE: June 1 WhatsApp Previous articleFive things you need to know today, June 1Next articleMidland father, son dead after single-engine plane crash admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Twitter Virgin Coco MojitoUpside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakeCreamy Fruit SaladPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay Congressman Mike Conaway talks to the Odessa American on Jan. 7, 2018. Local NewsBusiness DAILY OIL PRICE: June 1 WhatsApp By admin – June 1, 2018 The Latest: Biden to mark 500,000 lives lost with ceremony Pinterestlast_img read more

Foreclosure Inventory Rate Declines at an Accelerated Pace

first_img in Daily Dose, Featured, News 2016-12-05 Kendall Baer Kendall Baer is a Baylor University graduate with a degree in news editorial journalism and a minor in marketing. She is fluent in both English and Italian, and studied abroad in Florence, Italy. Apart from her work as a journalist, she has also managed professional associations such as Association of Corporate Counsel, Commercial Real Estate Women, American Immigration Lawyers Association, and Project Management Institute for Association Management Consultants in Houston, Texas. Born and raised in Texas, Baer now works as the online editor for DS News. Previous: An Economic Threat: Financial Leverage in Credit Default Swaps Next: Now That a Real Estate Developer is President-Elect . . . Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The national foreclosure inventory is experiencing the fastest rate of decline since 2014, according to the latest Mortgage Monitor presented by Black Knight Financial Services, and what’s more–there is no sign of it slowing down.“We’ve seen an improvement in both inflow and outflow of foreclosure inventories. In fact, October saw the lowest foreclosure start volume in nearly 12 years – and the lowest first time foreclosure start volume on record, dating back prior to the year 2000,” says Ben Graboske, EVP of Black Knight Data & Analytics. “There has been a corresponding rise in foreclosure completion rates (loans either being sold at foreclosure sale or otherwise liquidated). Sustained home price appreciation rates over the past four plus years, combined with generally tight for-sale inventory, have been key drivers there. Finally, we’ve also seen an increase in the share of active foreclosure loans that are being paid current or re-performing over the past 24 months.”In addition to foreclosure inventory declining to pre-crisis levels, the report indicates that the national 90+ delinquent inventory is on track to reach pre-crisis norms come late 2017. Black Knight reports that it should fully cross this mark in mid-2018.“Tighter lending standards post-recession have led to pristine mortgage performance in recent vintages. We’ve now seen default rates ‘over-correct’ and actually fall below long-term norms,” says Graboske. “This has led to historically low new troubled loans rates with about 60 percent of new default activity still coming from loans with nine or more years of seasoning, which continue to default at four times the rate of more recent originations. Additionally, the healthy employment market has enabled many borrowers to remain current on their mortgage payments.”The report has found that 15 states have already hit levels lower than those of pre-crisis, with five more states (Alabama, Texas, Missouri, Georgia, and Arizona) forecasted to hit pre-crisis foreclosure levels by the end of the year.Despite this good news, Black Knight reports that there are still seven states that are anticipated take five years or more to normalize at their current rates of improvement. These states are clustered in the Northeast.“Outflow continues to be the main hindrance in the northeastern part of the country, where the bulk of states operate under judicial foreclosure processes,” says Graboske.According to the report, these states still struggling with improving their foreclosure levels to those of pre-crisis include Maine, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Jersey, Massachusetts, New York, and Connecticut.“In New York for example – which has the highest remaining active foreclosure inventory in the country – only two percent of active foreclosures are completed on a monthly basis,” adds Graboske. “That’s a third of the national average completion rate of six percent and the lowest of any state in the country. It’s also one of the reasons why the average mortgage in active foreclosure in New York has been delinquent for 4.6 years, as compared the national average of 2.2. In addition to court delays, there are also mandatory mediation programs in some states which, while important, tend to further slow the process.”To view the full October Mortgage Monitor, click HERE. Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Foreclosure Inventory Rate Declines at an Accelerated Pace  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Foreclosure Inventory Rate Declines at an Accelerated Pace Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily About Author: Kendall Baer December 5, 2016 1,302 Views Subscribelast_img read more

Money intended for Ebrington may have been spent elsewhere by NI Executive

first_img Facebook Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Google+ Previous articlePolice arrest man in Derry shooting investigationNext articleDonegal fishermen urged to make their views known on quota allocations News Highland Facebook NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH WhatsApp Money intended for Ebrington may have been spent elsewhere by NI Executive News Google+ Twittercenter_img Twitter Pinterest Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published It’s emerged that money earmarked for the redevelopment of Ebrington barracks in Derry may have been spent elsewhere.The development of Ebrington is a flagship project in the city, and the site will host several UK City of Culture events in 2013.According to the BBC, money from the sale of Magherafelt Barracks should have gone to Derry’s regeneration company, Ilex, but instead went to the Executive.The Magherafelt barracks was one of six sites transferred to the Executive for free in 2003, on the basis that any money raised from their sale would be used for peace projects.However, the Northern Ireland Audit Office says it’s unclear if this was achieved.It also said it has concerns that Stormont did not get the best value from the sale of a former army barracks in Belfast’s Malone Road.The Malone Road site was bought for £3.8m, less than the initial valuation, and the developer who purchased it sold the site on the same day it was bought.The office of the First and Deputy First Minister and the Department of Finance disagree that they could have got more for that site. By News Highland – November 22, 2011 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton WhatsApplast_img read more

Punjab and Haryana High Court Imposes Cost Of 10,000 On A Couple For Not Wearing Mask During Wedding Ceremony[Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesPunjab and Haryana High Court Imposes Cost Of 10,000 On A Couple For Not Wearing Mask During Wedding Ceremony[Read Order] Radhika Roy2 Jun 2020 9:29 AMShare This – xPunjab and Haryana High Court has imposed costs of Rs. 10,000 on a couple for not wearing masks during their wedding which took place during the national lockdown imposed in wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Justice Hari Pal Verma of the Punjab & Haryana HC further directed for the money deposited to be utilized for the purpose of arranging masks for the public at large within…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginPunjab and Haryana High Court has imposed costs of Rs. 10,000 on a couple for not wearing masks during their wedding which took place during the national lockdown imposed in wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Justice Hari Pal Verma of the Punjab & Haryana HC further directed for the money deposited to be utilized for the purpose of arranging masks for the public at large within the Hoshiarpur district. A writ petition had been filed under Section 482 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, for issuance of appropriate directions to the State to provide protection to the couple from parties who were opposed to the marriage and were resorting to illegal means to separate the couple from each other. The Counsel for the Petitioners had submitted that there was imminent danger to the life and liberty of the Petitioners and, a representation had also been moved to the Senior Superintendent of Police, Gurdaspur. Justice Verma, without going into the validity of the marriage, disposed of the petition with a direction to the SSP, Gurdaspur, to take appropriate remedial measures on the representation. However, while perusing the photographs of the marriage ceremony, the Learned Single Judge noted that the Petitioners and other attending persons were not wearing masks, which were a necessity due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In light of the above observation, Justice Verma imposed costs of Rs. 10,000 on the Petitioners, which is to be deposited with the Deputy Commissioner of Hoshiarpur within a period of 15 days. Moreover, the amount is to be utilized for the arrangement of masks for the public in the district of Hoshiarpur.Click here to download the Order Next Storylast_img read more

Concern as Carndonagh court sittings relocated

first_imgAudioHomepage BannerNews Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Harps come back to win in Waterford Twitter Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th DL Debate – 24/05/21 center_img Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty By News Highland – April 17, 2019 It’s been confirmed that Carndonagh Court sittings will be relocated to Buncrana for the next four months, and possibly longer, with local Councillor Albert Doherty saying there is now a very real fear that the relocation could become a permanent one. Cllr Doherty has been calling for Carndonagh court sittings to be relocated to Colgan Hall while the local Courthouse is closed pending renovations.Following a visit to the town last week, the Courts Service’s Regional Manager Brendan Mc Donald confirmed that he has visited the Colgan Hall and that the Court Service authorities are assessing its suitability.He also confirmed substantial work is needed in the courthouse, but Cllr Doherty says it’s concerning that he gave no timetable for that work to be done:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/albcbjhjkghjghjrt1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Previous article3 men arrested in Letterkenny in organised crime probeNext articleDigital Hub established on Arranmore Island News Highland Pinterest WhatsApp Pinterest FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Google+ Concern as Carndonagh court sittings relocatedlast_img read more